This one-day course, the first of two, aims to present the latest research and clinical practice guidelines to facilitate evidence-based dietary management of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It is for BDA members who currently manage, or are keen to develop knowledge in managing, adults with IBS. The course is taught through formal lectures, group work and discussion, and case studies. 

The course for Day 1 covers:

o   IBS: definition, aetiology, prevalence, diagnostic criteria, classification, symptoms

o   National guidelines for the clinical and dietary management of IBS

o   Evidence for first-line dietary intervention in IBS  

o   First-line dietary management in IBS: clinical and dietary assessment, evaluating effectiveness, case studies

o   Resources for healthcare professionals and people with IBS

o   Group discussion on clinical practice at a local and national levels

o   Post-course work to support your skills and clinical practice in the management of IBS, with pre-course reading for Day 2: second-line dietary management (low FODMAP dietary intervention). 

Aim:  

To gain key knowledge and skills in the first-line dietary management of IBS using an evidence-based practical approach.

This one-day course, the first of two, aims to present the latest research and clinical practice guidelines to facilitate evidence-based dietary management of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It is for BDA members who currently manage, or are keen to develop knowledge in managing, adults with IBS. The course is taught through formal lectures, group work and discussion, and case studies. 

The course for Day 1 covers:

o   IBS: definition, aetiology, prevalence, diagnostic criteria, classification, symptoms

o   National guidelines for the clinical and dietary management of IBS

o   Evidence for first-line dietary intervention in IBS  

o   First-line dietary management in IBS: clinical and dietary assessment, evaluating effectiveness, case studies

o   Resources for healthcare professionals and people with IBS

o   Group discussion on clinical practice at a local and national levels

o   Post-course work to support your skills and clinical practice in the management of IBS, with pre-course reading for Day 2: second-line dietary management (low FODMAP dietary intervention). 

Aim:  

To gain key knowledge and skills in the first-line dietary management of IBS using an evidence-based practical approach.

This study day is the first of two that aim to consolidate and advance practice in dietetic management of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) using and evidenced based and patient centred approach. 

It commences with a brief introduction to IBS – the definition and different classifications, presenting symptoms and possible causes and then, in line with both the NICE 2015 guidelines and BDA guidance, uses a step-wise approach to the dietetic management of IBS. Case-studies are used to enable participants to become confident in the use of a first-line approach, including the use of the BDA factsheets. The evidence and principles supporting the use of a low FODMAP diet is covered and again case-studies used to enable participants to gain confidence in the use of a low FODMAP diet as a second-line approach. 

Throughout reference is made to the supporting evidence base – for example the recent publications in the JHND reviewing the evidence behind the first and second line approach.

The reintroduction of foods containing FODMAPs with discussion about the practicalities. 

A discussion about the use of probiotics with reference to the supporting literature is included. 

Whilst the first day introduces the use of a low FODMAP diet as a second-line approach, the second day will solely focus on the dietetic support required to enable patients to follow a low FODMAP diet and then how to re-introduce foods with a high FODMAP content back into the diet to prevent unnecessary over-restriction.

This study day is the first of two that aim to consolidate and advance practice in dietetic management of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) using and evidenced based and patient centred approach. 

It commences with a brief introduction to IBS – the definition and different classifications, presenting symptoms and possible causes and then, in line with both the NICE 2015 guidelines and BDA guidance, uses a step-wise approach to the dietetic management of IBS. Case-studies are used to enable participants to become confident in the use of a first-line approach, including the use of the BDA factsheets. The evidence and principles supporting the use of a low FODMAP diet is covered and again case-studies used to enable participants to gain confidence in the use of a low FODMAP diet as a second-line approach. 

Throughout reference is made to the supporting evidence base – for example the recent publications in the JHND reviewing the evidence behind the first and second line approach.

The reintroduction of foods containing FODMAPs with discussion about the practicalities. 

A discussion about the use of probiotics with reference to the supporting literature is included. 

Whilst the first day introduces the use of a low FODMAP diet as a second-line approach, the second day will solely focus on the dietetic support required to enable patients to follow a low FODMAP diet and then how to re-introduce foods with a high FODMAP content back into the diet to prevent unnecessary over-restriction.

This study day is the first of two that aim to consolidate and advance practice in dietetic management of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) using and evidenced based and patient centred approach. 

It commences with a brief introduction to IBS – the definition and different classifications, presenting symptoms and possible causes and then, in line with both the NICE 2015 guidelines and BDA guidance, uses a step-wise approach to the dietetic management of IBS. Case-studies are used to enable participants to become confident in the use of a first-line approach, including the use of the BDA factsheets. The evidence and principles supporting the use of a low FODMAP diet is covered and again case-studies used to enable participants to gain confidence in the use of a low FODMAP diet as a second-line approach. 

Throughout reference is made to the supporting evidence base – for example the recent publications in the JHND reviewing the evidence behind the first and second line approach.

The reintroduction of foods containing FODMAPs with discussion about the practicalities. 

A discussion about the use of probiotics with reference to the supporting literature is included. 

Whilst the first day introduces the use of a low FODMAP diet as a second-line approach, the second day will solely focus on the dietetic support required to enable patients to follow a low FODMAP diet and then how to re-introduce foods with a high FODMAP content back into the diet to prevent unnecessary over-restriction.

This study day is the first of two that aim to consolidate and advance practice in dietetic management of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) using and evidenced based and patient centred approach. 

It commences with a brief introduction to IBS – the definition and different classifications, presenting symptoms and possible causes and then, in line with both the NICE 2015 guidelines and BDA guidance, uses a step-wise approach to the dietetic management of IBS. Case-studies are used to enable participants to become confident in the use of a first-line approach, including the use of the BDA factsheets. The evidence and principles supporting the use of a low FODMAP diet is covered and again case-studies used to enable participants to gain confidence in the use of a low FODMAP diet as a second-line approach. 

Throughout reference is made to the supporting evidence base – for example the recent publications in the JHND reviewing the evidence behind the first and second line approach.

The reintroduction of foods containing FODMAPs with discussion about the practicalities. 

A discussion about the use of probiotics with reference to the supporting literature is included. 

Whilst the first day introduces the use of a low FODMAP diet as a second-line approach, the second day will solely focus on the dietetic support required to enable patients to follow a low FODMAP diet and then how to re-introduce foods with a high FODMAP content back into the diet to prevent unnecessary over-restriction.